EEB Seminar: September 12th

This week we welcome Carly Rozins.

Meeting our global population’s food needs has involved intensive mechanization and centralization of food production. While this industrialization has allowed farmers to provide food for a burgeoning population, it has fundamentally changed the life cycles of domesticated animals in ways that create new and unknown threats to global food security. In my research I build mathematical models aimed at answering the question: how do modern agricultural management practices impact infectious disease burden, the risk of disease outbreaks and pathogen evolution? In this talk I will focus on recent changes to the poultry and the honeybee industries.

EEB Seminar: September 5th

This week we welcome Luke Mahler.

The central aim of my research is to understand how ecological and evolutionary factors combine to determine biodiversity patterns over large spatial and temporal scales. To do this, I use radiations of Anolis lizards on Caribbean islands as a natural experiment to test hypotheses about macroevolution, biogeography, and community ecology. In this seminar, I will ask how biogeographic patterns and community structure, both of which bear strong signatures of macroevolutionary history, are being reshaped by human activities in the Anthropocene. Specifically, I will ask how classic biogeographic factors (e.g., island area and isolation) and economic trade combine to predict species richness in invaded island faunas, and how natural climate gradients and recent land use patterns jointly predict the assembly of local communities within islands.