EEB Seminar: November 13th

 

On Thursday, Dr. Jessica Forrest will talk about

Solitary bees in a warming world

at 12:30 in the EEB lounge (BioSciences 4338)

The seminar is hosted by Shelley Arnott
 

bee bee

Ectotherms in temperate regions stand to benefit from globally rising temperatures, which ought to increase development rates and foraging opportunities. However, climate change can also bring declining snowpack, altered phenology, and more variable weather, all of which may negatively affect ectotherms and other organisms. In this seminar, I will explore ways in which solitary bees—an important group of native pollinators—are affected by climate change, particularly in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, where I have focused my field work.

jessica forrestBy tracking reproductive success, rates of development and parasitism, and over-winter survival of individual bees, we are beginning to understand what factors limit population growth in bee species with different life-history strategies. The long-term goal is to be able to forecast bee population and community responses to multiple types of environmental change, including a warming climate.
 
Jessica Forrest is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Ottawa. She obtained her MSc from Queen’s, studying zooplankton ecology with Shelley Arnott. She switched to terrestrial ecology when she began her PhD on plant-pollinator interactions with James Thomson at the University of Toronto. Jessica continues to investigate the evolutionary ecology of pollinators and pollination, with a focus on anticipating the responses of plants and their pollinators to various types of environmental change.

Visit Dr. Forrest’s website at http://forrestlab.wordpress.com/

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